Posts by harrybailey.

Cloning rows in a mysql table

If you have a lot of data in a mysql table and you’d like to duplicate some of the rows – maybe with a change or two as well – then here is the sql you’ll need…

INSERT INTO table (column1, column2,column3, column4)
SELECT column1, 234, column4, NOW()
FROM table
WHERE id IN (6,7)

You have some choices…
You can copy or clone from one table to another by changing the table names above.
You can define your own values. Examples of 234 and NOW() are above.
You can include or drop the WHERE clause to choose which (if not all) rows to clone

Ping a url or script using IFTTT (with no repercussions)

Update: This actually doesn’t work as I’d hoped. Because flickr reports an error each time, eventually IFTTT disables the recipe after a few hours of calls. Back to the drawing board.

I’ve been trying to get IFTTT (if this then that) to send a call to a php script file when a trigger goes off for months. The problem wasn’t getting it to work in the first place, but for it not to leave any artifacts hanging around, or repercussions as I call them. I wanted the script to be triggered and that to be the end of it, with no files being created or errors being recorded.

An example of the problem would be the IFTTT Google Docs channel. You can upload a file to google docs from a url. You can define that url to be your php script and then tell your script to return a 404 (after it’s done its coding goodness) but when you view Google Docs a new file has still been created. If you want to use this for a large number of pings, you’re going to end up with a folder full of pointless files and a waste of your disc space. The Evernote and WordPress channels are a similar story. Even when you attempt to fail the call to your url (with a 404 or 503) they still create a note or post.

Continue Reading… »

Yii (and Yii2) wildcard / catch all url rules

Sometimes you might want to do various checks of the url in yii config main and then send every other request to a particular controller.

The rule you need to add last to the urlManager is…

'(.*)' => 'controller/action',

… and now any rule that isn’t matched previously will end up being sent to your defined controller and action.

In Yii2 you can do the following:

'<url:(.*)>' => 'controller/action',

Hide the Fancy Force Login Prompt

It really annoys me that Fancy force you to login before you can see that page you’ve click the link to view.

Here is a bookmarklet you can drag to your bookmarks bar. Then when they try to force you to log in, click it to hide the login prompt and view the page as normal.

Drag the following to your bookmark bar:

Extending jQuery selectors and understanding the options

There are tons of posts around which bang on about how to extend jQuery to include your own selectors, but to find one that actually explains your options is a pain, hence this post.

jQuery has an extend function baked in which looks something like $.extend(target, object1, object2); and will extend target (which should be an object) with the properties and methods of object1 and object2. You can add as many additional objects (think object3, object4 and object5) to the end as you like.

What we want to do it extend a very specific part of jQuery itself. The $.expr[‘:’] object which stores the built in selectors and any we add.

Indeed when you console.log($.expre[‘:’]) you see a full list of the selectors available in the version of jQuery you are using:

animated
button
checkbox
checked
data
disabled
empty
enabled
file
focus
focusable
has
header
hidden
image
input
onbranch
parent
password
radio
reset
selected
submit
tabbable
text
visible

NB: I’ve removed the ui- selectors to avoid confusion.

So now you know what not to call your selector (unless you want to replace a built in one), we can define our own…

$.extend($.expr[':'],{
	block: function(e,i,m,s) {
		return $(e).css('display') === 'block';
	}
});

The first thing you will notice about the above is that the selector function takes up to (although may need fewer) four argument; e, i, m and s.

e is the element currently being checked.
i is the index of that elements within all elements being checked (starts at zero)
m stands for match and is additional information that we can use in our function.
s stands for stack and is all elements in the current selection or stack

so $(e) makes the current element e into a jQuery object
i allows us to check for the 3rd, 6th, 23rd thing
m contains the following:

[0] is the actual selector called. For example :anyof(“div,4,hr,10″)
[1] is just the selector name. For example: anyof
[2] is the type of quotes used (if any) in the selector. So ” would be returned for :anyof(“div,4,hr,10”)
[3] is any parameters used in the form of a string so “div,4,hr,10” from above

and s contains an array of one or more html elements.

So now we know what is actually returned we can write a cleverer selector…

$.extend($.expr[':'],{
	anyof: function(e,i,m,s) {
		if(m[3].length)
		{
			$(m[3].split(',')).each(function(i2,e2)
			{
				if(parseInt(e2))
				{
					// correct index?
					if(parseInt(e2) == i)
					{
						return true;
					}
				}
				else
				{
					// match selector
					if($(e).is(e2))
					{
						return true;
					}
				}
			});
			return false;
		}
		else
		{
			return false;
		}
	}
});

or if we wanted to check for the unique items in the stack:

$.extend($.expr[':'],{
	isunique: function(e,i,m,s) {
 
		$(s).each(function(i2,e2)
		{
			if($(e2).prop('tagName') == $(e).prop('tagName'))
			{
				return false;
			}
		});
 
		return true;
	}
});

NB: Since jQuery 1.6 you should use .prop() for tagName not attr()

The above selector will check all other elements in the stack and return only those with a unique tag. We could expand it to check other things about the element to see if it is truly unique such as it’s classes or styles.

NB: I haven’t checked all the code above and certainly haven’t optimised it, but it is likely to work as is or with a small number of fixes.