Posts categorized “css”.

CSS3 Element Wiggle With Keyframes

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This technique produces something similar to the wiggle you get on an iPhone when deleting items.

Be aware that keyframe animation is still very poor in Chrome and cases freezing and jumping if multiple items are animated at once.

The animation css below results in a hovered element rotating back and forth around it’s centre point. You can update the number of degrees and length of animation to change the appearance.

Just add this css and give your element the class ‘wiggler’ to implement

 
/* safari and chrome */
@-webkit-keyframes wiggle {
	0% {-webkit-transform:rotate(4deg);}
	50% {-webkit-transform:rotate(-4deg);}
	100% {-webkit-transform:rotate(4deg);}
}
 
/* firefox */
@-moz-keyframes wiggle {
	0% {-moz-transform:rotate(4deg);}
	50% {-moz-transform:rotate(-4deg);}
	100% {-moz-transform:rotate(4deg);}
}
 
/* anyone brave enough to implement the ideal method */
@keyframes wiggle {
	0% {transform:rotate(4deg);}
	50% {transform:rotate(-4deg);}
	100% {transform:rotate(4deg);}
}
 
.wiggler:hover {
	-webkit-animation: wiggle 0.5s infinite;
	-moz-animation: wiggle 0.5s infinite;
	animation: wiggle 0.5s infinite;
}

Twitter Bootstrap Tabs On Right Side

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Twitter’s bootstrap css currently doesn’t support tabs on the right hand side or floated right. We’ll here is the css to allow it.

We’ll stick to existing naming. Twitter use secondary-nav within topbar so let’s use that…

.tabs .secondary-nav {
	float:right;
	margin-left:10px;
	margin-right:0;
}

The the html for the tab you want to float right you need:

<li class="secondary-nav"><a href="#">Link Text</a></li>

The outcome is most tabs on the left and any with the new class positioned over to the right.

Hide Google Related Bar On Your Website With CSS

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Update: The css method of removing / hiding the related bar no longer works. See the new (javascript only) fix at bottom of this post.

Google recently released a new browser extension for Internet Explorer and Google Chrome called Google Related. I’m sure it will be coming to Firefox soon.

The extension adds a bar to the bottom of some website which shows things like maps, video, images, reviews and related websites.

To get the bar to show at the bottom of your browser Google injects an iframe at the end of your body tag which is positioned with css to always sit at the bottom of your browser and has a high z-index to ensure it always sits above everything else on the page.

No longer working css fix

The beauty of Google Related using an iframe in your own pages html is that you can hide it using a single css declaration. For now it’s as simple as…

iframe.grelated-iframe {
	display: none;
}

…although in the future, if Google get wise to webmasters hiding their Google Related bar you may need to do something like

iframe.grelated-iframe {
	left:-99999px !important;
	display: none !important;
}

Update November 2011

<iframe frameborder="0" src="http://www.gstatic.com/webgps/grelated_0_6_9/html/grelated_bar_iframe.html" style="border-top-width: 0px !important; border-right-width: 0px !important; border-bottom-width: 0px !important; border-left-width: 0px !important; border-style: initial !important; border-color: initial !important; bottom: 0px !important; display: block !important; left: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important; outline-width: 0px !important; outline-style: initial !important; outline-color: initial !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-right: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 0px !important; position: fixed !important; right: 0px !important; top: auto !important; vertical-align: baseline !important; visibility: visible !important; width: 100% !important; z-index: 2147483647 !important; height: 49px !important; " scrolling="no"></iframe>

As you can see Google no longer makes it easy to hide the tool using css. They’ve ensured every css property you could use to hide the iframe is forced as !important.

The only option left (if you still want to hide the bar) is to use javascript to hide or remove the element.

I’m suggesting a setInterval incase Google does an update which keeps trying to reshow / add the iframe.
I’m suggesting ‘none !important’ because it’s the highest selector value you can add and least likely to be replaced by other css on the page or that Google choose to inject.

setInterval(function()
{
 var ifr = document.body.getElementsByTagName('iframe'), l = ifr.length;
    for(var a = 0; a < l; a++)
    {
        if(ifr[a].src.match(/^http:\/\/www\.gstatic/))
        {
            ifr[a].style.display = 'none !important'
        }
    }
},1000);

That javascript will check all iframes in the page once every second to see if it’s the pesky Google related bar by checking the url (which may need updating in the future!) and hides it if it does.

If you’re unsure of what to do with the javascript code, copy the JavaScript above and paste it into a .js file which is included on every page of your site, or copy the whole next code chunk and paste it just before the closing body tag of your page.

<script type="text/javascript">
setInterval(function()
{
 var ifr = document.body.getElementsByTagName('iframe'), l = ifr.length;
    for(var a = 0; a < l; a++)
    {
        if(ifr[a].src.match(/^http:\/\/www\.gstatic/))
        {
            ifr[a].style.display = 'none !important'
        }
    }
},1000);
</script>

If you use jQuery on your site then the following will do something very similar:

 
setInterval(function()
{
    $('body > iframe[src^=http://www.gstatic]').css({display:'none !important'});
},1000);

css transform rotation and parent element dimensions

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When you use css3 to rotate an element with it’s new transform property, you may find yourself fighting to keep it inside it’s parent.

To clarify, usually rotating an element will first put it into it’s usual position and then literally rotate it around it’s own centre, not caring if it now overlaps elements around it (well I suppose that’s the point sometimes?!?)

I’m using css transform to rotate, in combination with a little javascript to allow images to be rotated (and then saved) as part of PagePlay‘s super simple user interface.

So I initially start out with something like…

--div-------------------------
| ccw                     cw |
| --img--------------------- |
| |                        | |
| |                        | |
| |                        | |
| -------------------------- |
-----------------------------

When you click ccw (counter clockwise) or cw (clockwise) js switched classes on the img and it rotates. Initially, that would give me something like….


       ----------------
       |              |
--div-------------------------
| ccw  |              |   cw |
|      |              i      |
|      |              m      |
|      |              g      |
|      |              |      |
|      |              |      |
-----------------------------
       |              |
       ----------------

(loving the crude graphics? Thought so)

So what I wanted was for the parent div to sit around the image. The problem here is that the div parent doesn’t (and shouldn’t) care about the rotation of it’s child, so we need to make the div larger when it’s rotated. To do this I used a little bit of jQuery and maths to calculate the required additional space…

I don’t know whether the image is going to be taller or wider first, so we need to check that first and come up with a pixel margin to use later…

var img = $('rotator');
var img_w = img.width();
var img_h = img.height();
var the_margin = (img_w > img_h ? (img_w-img_h)/2 : 0);

The img width minus image height divided by 2 is the amount space above and below the standard space the image takes up that it will also need when rotated. If the image is taller than it is wide, we will already have enough space (you could do better by making the div smaller on rotation in this case).

So when we rotate we look at whether the image is rotated or not (rev tells me that here) and then based on that we add or remove the margin we calculated above to the top and bottom of the image to push it’s parent div away from it and make it large enough to accommodate the image.

img.css({marginTop:(rev ? 0 : marg),marginBottom:(rev ? 0 : marg)});

You could certainly do better with dealing with image which are portrait, but then maybe I’ll come back to that another time.

IE6 and the block level anchor (a) tags

To make Internet Explorer 6 treat block level anchor tags correctly, they need a declared width, height or my favourite Internet Explorer only style attribute, zoom:1

That is all.